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WHY TAEKWONDO?

Everyone has their own reason for training Taekwondo. People train for physical reasons such as exercise and conditioning, but they also train to strengthen personal qualities like self-discipline and self-esteem. Taekwondo is also known to benefit mental health through increased confidence, improved self-esteem, focus, concentration levels and self-discipline, as well as other mental benefits like inner calm and focus. Taekwondo is suitable for all ages. As well as the sporting and self-defense aspects to Taekwondo, there is also an exercise element, which brings health improvements such as balance, flexibility, stamina, strength and posture.

WHY SPARRING?

It is believed that sparring plays a highly important role in martial-arts because it allows for students to practice the techniques they have learned on another live and moving target, while being protected by gear. Sparring is also great for one’s stamina and resistance, also the back-and-forth movement mimics a life situation.

Sparring is necessary because it is the closest thing to a real fight, without actually being in a fight. Sparring allows you to work on applying the skills learned in your Taekwondo practice such as distance and rhythm. Controlling your distance between yourself and the other person and also being able to throw off the other person’s rhythm.

The benefits of sparring at your Martial-Arts school are being able to apply your techniques in real-world situations, helping with controlling yourself when sparring against other students, allows for your techniques to get sharpened, and also improves your all around fitness and footwork.

WHY PATTERNS?

Patterns also have meaning and historic relevance in Taekwondo. The name of the pattern and the number of movements of each pattern symbolize either heroic figures in Korean history or instances relating to historical events.

Patterns have fundamental movements that most, if not all, represent either attack or defense techniques, all performed in a sequence. There are a total of 24 patterns in Taekwondo.

The student systematically deals with several imaginary opponents under various assumptions, using every available attacking and blocking tool from different directions. Thus, pattern practice enables the student to go through many fundamental movements in series, to develop sparring techniques, improve flexibility of movements, master body shifting, build muscles and breath control, develop fluid and smooth motions, and gain rhythmical movements. Practicing patterns also enables a student to acquire certain special techniques that cannot be obtained from either fundamental exercises or sparring.

Patterns also have meaning and historic relevance in Taekwondo. The name of the pattern and the number of movements of each pattern symbolize either heroic figures in Korean history or instances relating to historical events.

WHY SELF DEFENSE?

Self-defense is important in Taekwondo because, much like sparring, it is a way for students to practice real-life scenarios and situations in a controlled environment. It allows for students to practice techniques and be in a fight, without actually being in a fight. In Taekwondo, you learn rules while practicing with other students. While those rules do not apply in real-life situations, they are to make sure students learn different escapes and ways to avoid being taken down when in a bad situation. Students begin learning basic techniques and continue on with weapons and take downs once they reach a higher belt level. 

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